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  6.  | Man injured in California motorcycle accident involving cop

Man injured in California motorcycle accident involving cop

| Jul 8, 2019 | Motorcycle Accidents |

There is no doubt for most people in California that police officers work hard to serve those they are sworn to protect. In the case of an emergency call, an officer is likely eager to quickly provide the necessary assistance. However, an officer who is attempting to respond to a call but is unaware of others in the same area as them could cause an accident. In fact, a motorcycle accident involving a police officer recently sent a man to the hospital with serious injuries.

The incident reportedly happened during the early morning hours of a day in June. According to reports, a police officer was parked on the shoulder of the road as he assisted another officer with a traffic stop. He originally had his rear amber warning lights on but reportedly engaged his emergency lights when he was dispatched to another location.

However, the officer reportedly initiated a U-turn directly into the path of the 26-year-old motorcyclist. As a result, the motorcyclist suffered a head injury and was flown to the hospital. The incident remains under investigation as police work to determine the speed at which the motorcycle was traveling and the distance between the motorcyclist and police officer at the time the emergency lights were engaged.

Unfortunately, a head injury often causes lifelong damage. In many cases, a victim’s life might be significantly altered. If such an injury is the result of negligence, some victims in California may choose to seek recompense by filing a personal injury lawsuit in a civil court. An attorney with experience with cases involving a motorcycle accident such as this can help this man fully understand his legal options and initiate appropriate action against all parties who may hold responsibility for injuries, including the officer’s employer.

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